Q&A on LSD Rides, Topical Bicarbonates, Group Rides, and Sugar

in Q&A episode, we cover a broad spectrum of topics including sugar consumption and its health effects, safe rates to increase volume, the pros and cons of group rides, the efficacy of topical bicarbonate products, and much more.

Fast Talk Podcast Q&A
Photo: Boris Stefanik

On today’s Q&A episode, we cover a broad spectrum of topics including sugar consumption and its health effects, safe rates to increase volume, the pros and cons of group rides, the efficacy of topical bicarbonate products, and much more.

Feeling flat during a recovery week can be frustrating. Trevor goes into a bit of the science on recovery weeks and how you’re likely to feel after a tough training build. Thanks to listener and mountain bike racer, Nancy T. from Albuquerque, New Mexico for sending this question. We received a voice memo from collegiate racer Preston M. in California who has some extra flexibility in his schedule this summer. With no races on the horizon, he wants to know how long and how often his LSD (Long Slow Distance) rides should be to progress to the next level. Reminder, you can record a question for us on a voice memo app on your phone and then email it to us at fasttalk@fasttalklabs.com. We also address the potential usefulness of increasingly popular topical bicarbonate products. Trevor looks at the science literature so you don’t have to. Sports drinks, race food, candy, cookies—we eat it when we race, but how much of these simple sugars should we be consuming, and what are the positive and negative effects on athletes versus sedentary individuals? We dive in. If you’ve been on a group ride, you know they can get competitive. Giancarlo B. in Boulder asks how to incorporate these rides into a polarized training model. Gina J., a long-time runner turned triathlete, is wondering why her heart rate during her cycling training sessions is lower than her running heart rate. Trevor explains.

Let’s make you fast!

References

  • Åstrand, P.-O., & Saltin, B. (1961). Maximal oxygen uptake and heart rate in various types of muscular activity. Journal of Applied Physiology, 16(6), 977–981. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1152/jappl.1961.16.6.977
  • Chennaoui, M., Gomez-Merino, D., Drogou, C., Bourrilhon, C., Sautivet, S., & Guezennec, C. Y. (2004). Hormonal and Metabolic Adaptation in Professional Cyclists During Training. Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology, 29(6), 714–730. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1139/h04-046
  • Kern, M., Misell, L. M., Ordille, A., Alm, M., & Salewske, B. (2018). Double-blind, Placebo Controlled, Randomized Crossover Pilot Study Evaluating The Impacts Of Sodium Bicarbonate in a Transdermal Delivery System on Physiological Parameters and Exercise Performance: 2402 Board #238 June 1 11. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 50(5S), 595. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000537049.16090.97
  • Misell, L., Kern, M., Ordille, A., Alm, M., & Salewske, B. (2018). Double-blind, Placebo Controlled, Randomized Crossover Pilot Study Evaluating the Impacts of Sodium Bicarbonate in a Transdermal Delivery System on Delayed Muscle Onset Soreness: 2403 Board #239 June 1 11. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 50(5S), 595. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000537050.23714.37
  • Seiler, S, Jøranson, K., Olesen, B. V., & Hetlelid, K. J. (2011). Adaptations to aerobic interval training: interactive effects of exercise intensity and total work duration. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 23(1), 74–83. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2011.01351.x
  • Seiler, Stephen. (2010). What is Best Practice for Training Intensity and Duration Distribution in Endurance Athletes? International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 5(3), 276–291. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.5.3.276
  • Urhausen, A., Gabriel, H., & Kindermann, W. (1995). Blood Hormones as Markers of Training Stress and Overtraining. Sports Medicine, 20(4), 251–276. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-199520040-00004
  • Vermeire, K. M., Vandewiele, G., Caen, K., Lievens, M., Bourgois, J. G., & Boone, J. (2019). Training Progression in Recreational Cyclists: No Linear Dose-Response Relationship With Training Load. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 1. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1519/jsc.0000000000003340

Episode Transcript

This content is for Listener, Library, and Forum members only.
Listener Membership is FREE. Please join now.
Log In Join Now